Digital creativity in the Hunter Valley

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Twenty-Five Catholic school teachers, from all over the Hunter Valley region in rural NSW gathered together on a very warm Friday 17th February at All Saints College, St Peter’s Campus in Maitland for an all-day professional learning experience based on getting more familiar with a range of Adobe’s creative productivity tools.

We started the day with an overview of what Adobe is as a company and how its software is being used in education and industry around the world to enhance creativity & digital experiences. Then we explored some of the free mobile apps with the teachers teaming up to produce a short video using Adobe Premiere Clip.

Other products we work-shopped including the three Adobe Spark tools (Spark Post, Spark Video & Spark Page) and Adobe Photoshop with a focus on 3D banners, content aware fill, clone stamp & the liquefy filter.

Most of the afternoon sessions were dedicated to more serious video production & video editing skills with Adobe Premiere Pro.

We used a green screen to film one of the teachers then shared that footage with other footage & audio to make a short video story about hover-boarding.

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All the resources that were shared throughout this day can be found on the Adobe Education Exchange via – http://bit.ly/adobe17Feb17

Special thank you to Christine Chapple (Education Officer, Catholic Schools Office) and All Saints College, St Peter’s Campus in Maitland for organising this event.

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Adobe Day with Dapto High

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A specially selected group of talented student from Year 8 to 12 at Dapto High School in New South Wales had a very early start on Wednesday 15th February. They met at Dapto station at 6.45 AM to get to the Adobe Sydney office by 9.15 AM for an Adobe Day with me.

Following a tour of the office, we set up a green screen to do some filming and went though a wide range of key camera capture techniques.

Here are some of the key techniques we looked at …

Most of the day was spent getting familiar with Adobe Premiere Pro to edit the footage that was filmed along with a range of footage and audio options.

The students were a delight to work with. They picked up the various techniques quickly and were able to apply them.

Adobe Education Leader Darcy Moore, Deputy Principal at Dapto High, was instrumental in organising this event. I’m, looking forward to visiting the school later this year and continuing to hear from Darcy about how these students progress with their video literacy skills.

Freshwater comes to Adobe

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On Tuesday 14th February, 2016 a wonderful group of Year 12 Multimedia students from Northern Beaches Secondary College Freshwater Senior Campus visited the Adobe office in Sydney for an Adobe Day.

An Adobe Day usually involves a group of students being mentored by an Adobe expert on a project based activity either at the amazing Sydney office or on location at the student’s school. On this Adobe Day, these Year 12 students were doing an Industry Study on Adobe as a company and also wanted to know more about how to use Adobe Muse & Photoshop to present their work.

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To help the students collect more information for their Industry Study on Adobe, Wayne Weisse, Adobe’s Sales Director – Public Sector Asia Pacific spoke to the students and answered their questions. They were keen to know about the structure of the business, technologies used for production and services, sustainability practices and the way Adobe is involved with various corporate responsibility projects around the globe.

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The students then went on a tour of the Sydney office.

After the tour, we worked on some Photoshop & Adobe Muse techniques.

The students also spent some time showing me the current stage they are up to with their major Multimedia assessment.

Their teacher, Andrew Lai is an Adobe Campus Leader. He is very passionate about giving his students the best opportunities to be creative and to develop their 21st century communication skills.

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Gen Z students see themselves differently to their teachers

In October, 2016 Edelman Intelligence and Adobe undertook an international study titled Gen Z in the Classroom, Creating the Future to help explore how creativity plays a role in preparing Generation Z students for their future in the workforce, and how students learn and think about the future in the context of creativity.

This is the first in a series of my journal posts based on this study. Click here to get a summary of all the findings.

research1Who are Gen Z?

Gen Z, also known as the Post Millennials or the iGeneration, refer to young people born between the mid 1990s and the early 2000s. In 2017, they would include students in their mid-teens and early 20s. So broadly speaking, they are today’s high school students and university under-graduates.

The study involved over 2,500 Gen Z students and over 1,000 teachers of Gen Z students from the Australia, the United Kingdom, the United States and Germany.

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Study objectives

The objectives of the study were to:

  • Understand how students view creativity and its impact/application across all different types of classes and potential careers;
  • Explore what creative tools students and educators see as most helpful in developing their online brands;
  • Uncover the synergies and gaps within the student/educator experience today when it comes to creativity, as well as what each group sees as the future of learning and working; and
  • Identify which regions “shine” in how they are preparing for the future workforce when it comes to creativity, and which fall behind.

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Difference in perceptions

One question where there was an interesting differentiation between the teachers and students was Which of the following words describes Gen Z – Smart, Creative, Hard Working, Team Player, Curious, Social, A little lazy, Outgoing, Bored by the past, Follower, Multi-tasker, Nervous about the future, Shy, Ambitious, Lonely, Original, Confident & None of these?

The students and teachers were able to provide multiple answers and the Gen Z’s top responses in all four countries were:

  • Creative (Australia – 46%, US – 47%, UK – 37%, Germany – 44%)
  • Smart (Australia – 43%, US – 63%, UK – 39%, Germany – 40%)
  • Team player (Australia – 44%, US – 42%, UK – 42%, Germany – 40%)

The teachers of Gen Z student’s top responses in all four countries were:

  • A little lazy (Australia – 74%, US – 76%, UK – 65%, Germany – 70%)
  • Social (Australia – 60%, US – 65%, UK – 51%, Germany – 30%)
  • Bored by the past (Australia – 49%, US – 49%, UK – 33%, Germany – 49%)

Only German teachers (26%) used the term Creative in the top 5 descriptors of Gen Z students.

So it appears that Gen Z students see themselves differently from their teachers. Some of the possible reasons for this do come out in other parts of this study which I will write about in future articles.

What is creativity?

When recently chatting to educators about these perceptions the thought arose that students may define creativity differently to their teachers.

Some argue that creativity cannot be formally defined. I tend to think that Sir Ken Robinson provides a good definition when he says in his book Out of Our Minds (and on many other occasions) that creativity is the process of having original ideas that have value. The ideas may not be so original that no one has ever heard of them before, they need to be original within the context of the creator in their classroom, home, community etc.

The idea does need to be valued. This is a possible sticking point of distinction between Gen z students and their teachers.Students may well see something as simple as adding a filter on an Instagram image as being creative, where as their teacher may see no value or originality in this process, therefore not recognise that activity as being creative.

I would like to encourage students and teachers to keep the conversation about the importance of creativity going in all curriculum areas.

Sir Ken says that everyone has the ability to be creative bu virtue of being human. He also suggests that creativity is possible in all areas of human life, in science, the arts, mathematics, technology, cooking, teaching, politics, business etc. And finally, Sir Ken points out that creativity can be cultivated and refined. It can be taught and can involve an increasing mastery of skills, knowledge and ideas.

Click here for more on this.

There were a number of findings in the study where both Gen Z students and teachers of Gen Z agreed.

I will expand on them in future posts.

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Stay informed about future Adobe in Education professional learning opportunities for teachers in Australasia via: http://bit.ly/adobeEDU-events
Join the Australasian Adobe Professional Learning Group on EdEx to say in touch with Adobe in Education edex.adobe.com/group/apac-pl/

Check past Adobe in Education active use activities via timkitchen.net/ and CreateEdu TV http://bit.ly/CreateEduTV

 

Adobe Apps for Chromebooks

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Adobe announced this week that a range of their mobile apps are now available on Google Chromebook laptops that allow the use of Android apps. This is great news for teachers and students who rely on Chromebooks and have been frustrated by a lack of access to Adobe’s great creativity tools.

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Chromebook users  will now be able to download the following mobile apps for free on their devices if they allow the use of Android apps:

This is the beginning of a long-term plan for Adobe applications and Chromebooks in partnership with Google. Adobe will be releasing details about future products as they are available.

Students of all ages can benefit from these apps, but if they’re logging in on their own device they will need to be 13 or older to sign up for an Adobe ID.

Students don’t need to be online all the time to access the apps on their Chrombooks. The only times a student needs to be connected to the internet are to receive updates and to sync their Creative Cloud account to other devices.

The mobile apps are a great way to introduce students to design concepts and design tools, but they’re best used as a supplement to Adobe Creative Cloud, not a replacement. The mobile apps have key features from the Creative Cloud products, but users are limited in what they can accomplish using the mobile apps alone.

Click here to see a range of helpful tutorials

Click here to see the Adobe Blog about this annoucement

Join the now over 350,000 teachers on the free Adobe Education Exchange to get lots of ideas on how to work with these apps in the classroom.

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Stay informed about future Adobe in Education professional learning opportunities for teachers in Australasia via: http://bit.ly/adobeEDU-events

Join the Australasian Adobe Professional Learning Group on EdEx to say in touch with Adobe in Education https://edex.adobe.com/group/apac-pl/

Check past Adobe in Education active use activities via this journal and CreateEdu TV http://bit.ly/CreateEduTV

 

Creativity at Brigidine College, Brisbane

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Brigidine College is a delightful Independent Catholic Girls School in the hills of Indooroopilly, near the centre of Brisbane, Australia. I had the pleasure of keynoting one of their opening staff days for 2017 and also running some Adobe related workshops.

The keynote topic was Creativity in Education is no longer an option, it’s an absolute necessity : Preparing GenZ for the real world. It was an honour to introduce many of the staff to the work and messaging of Mitch Resnick, Seymour Papert, Sir Ken Robinson, Edward de Bono, Professor Yong Zhao, Alfie Kohn, Dan Haesler, Marc Prensky and other education thought leaders.

I also used this opportunity to share the most recent research from Adobe titled: GEN Z in the Classroom: Creating the Future. This involved 2,521 students and 1,016 teachers from Australia, US, UK & Germany. Key objectives of this study are:

  • Understand how students view creativity and its impact/application across all different types of classes and potential careers;
  • Explore what creative tools students and educators see as most helpful in developing their online brands;
  • Uncover the synergies and gaps within the student/educator experience today when it comes to creativity, as well as what each group sees as the future of learning and working; and
  • Identify which regions “shine” in how they are preparing for the future workforce when it comes to creativity, and which fall behind.

More information & findings can be found via adobeeducate.com/genz

My keynote slides are available via: http://bit.ly/adobe-brigidine17

Following the keynote, Brian Chau (Adobe Solution Consultant) and I ran a series of hands-on workshops with a focus on Adobe Spark and Adobe Acrobat DC.

 

 

How & why Adobe tools are making a creative difference in Aussie classrooms

As the 2017 school year approaches, teachers and students all over this part of the world are making the most of the last week or so of the holiday break but also starting to prepare for the academic year ahead.

This is a great time of year to look at some of the Adobe applications that teachers and students all over the world are using in the learning and teaching process.

The following video may help inspire you. It was filmed at the Adobe Education Community Leadership Summit in Sydney last October and feature a range of educators from all areas of Australia sharing how and why they use Adobe products in their classrooms to enhance the creative construction of learning and communication.

 

You can stay informed about future Adobe in Education professional learning opportunities for teachers in Australasia via: http://bit.ly/adobeEDU-events
Join the Australasian Adobe Professional Learning Group on EdEx to say in touch with Adobe in Education https://edex.adobe.com/group/apac-pl/

Check past Adobe in Education active use activities via this journal and CreateEdu TV http://bit.ly/CreateEduTV